Hannah Faith Yata – Artist, Surrealism

© instagram/hannahyata

Hannah Faith Yata is half Japanese and was born and raised in a small town in Georgia. She grew up with a deep love of nature and animals passed down by the beautiful surroundings in the country and her mother.

© instagram/hannahyata

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Hannah Yata’s Website

Hannah Yata on Instagram

As a young adult, she studied feminism, psychology, and art in college. Graduating with a BFA in painting from the University of Georgia in 2012 where she thereafter moved to New York to be an artist. In 2015, she was commissioned to do several works of art for musician B.o.B where she quit her full-time job to focus solely on her own painting. Now married to fellow artist, Jean Pierre Arboleda, the two painters work passionately to call attention to industry, its effects on our psyche and the living world around us.

© instagram/hannahyata

In her paintings, Yata seeks to interweave the parallels of the unconscious with the struggle of the natural environment and how it relates to views regarding the body of the woman and that of nature. Her use of masks express different types of emotion and characters while incorporating her fascination with culture and tribalism. Body paint and designs play with a romantic idea of becoming more in touch with the earth and the life forces that dwell within, while also celebrating the feeling of energy and wildness. The surreal and psychedelic landscapes of her work erupt with tension and beauty, the grotesque and the wild to form exhilarating and mind altering dreamscapes.

© instagram/hannahyata
© instagram/hannahyata
© instagram/hannahyata

 

© instagram/hannahyata

About Art in The World.

Art is inseparable from its social context. It is inspired by its political, religious and intellectual environment and can change it too. Good art will always encourage change. When the first caveman painted a bison on his cave wall it would have caused a sensation because no one had seen such a thing before. Crowds would have gathered to admire it and talk about it, no less so than when Michelangelo unveiled his first David or completed the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. It is the originality of the work, the skill gone into producing it as well as the catalytic effect it creates in our minds which makes it art. Our first caveman artist, by taking something that his tribe were used to seeing alive and running around and placing it on the wall as a recognizable reproduction, had made something completely new in human terms. In doing so, he expanded the artistic consciousness of his fellow natives, a leap from known reality to imagined reality, a leap that separated his age from the ones that had gone before, and in this way opened up an infinite number of new possibilities for the future.

© instagram/hannahyata
© instagram/hannahyata
© instagram/hannahyata

 

© instagram/hannahyata

Today´s artists in the twenty-first century have an even bigger challenge. Everything has already been done (hasn´t it?) so finding new ways of expanding our awareness through art is becoming harder. The Turner Prize specializes in sourcing original artistic concepts and often scandalizes by doing so. In the search for conscious expanding works, sometimes errors of judgment occur. But there is no limit to human creativity and no end to the story of art. Art will continue to evolve and real breaks with the past will continue to stun audiences into new ways of thinking about the present.

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